Safeguarding Children Policy Statement and Child Protection Procedures

Safeguarding Children Policy Statement

 

Introduction


National Day Nurseries Association is a national charity which aims to enhance the development and education of children in their early years, through the provision of support services to childcare providers and local authorities (LAs). NDNA is dedicated to the provision, support and promotion of high-quality care and education for the benefit of children, families and communities and committed to safeguarding children and promoting their welfare.

NDNA works with childcare providers and other agencies to develop quality childcare services, which in turn will promote and safeguard children’s welfare.

This policy and procedure sits within NDNA’s wider organisational policies and procedures which govern the way in which we work with employees, colleagues, stakeholders and customers.

NDNA is committed to ensuring that all staff have the necessary knowledge and skills to carry out their duties and have a sufficient understanding of how this policy and procedure supports them in promoting and safeguarding the welfare of children. This will be done through the recruitment and induction process and by offering training and support to all staff, consultants, volunteers and board members. It will be monitored through supervision and appraisals to ensure knowledge and awareness is in place. This links to NDNA’s training, induction and recruitment policies and procedures.

Should anyone believe that this policy is not being upheld, it is their duty to report the matter to the attention of the Senior Designated Person (SDP) detailed below.

Purpose


This policy makes it clear that within NDNA, we all have a responsibility to safeguard children and young people, and to protect them from harm. These procedures aim to raise awareness of how to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

Fulfilling our responsibilities – application of the policy


As part of our commitment to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children, childcare providers and practitioners and our staff, consultants and volunteers, this document is underpinned by other organisational policies and procedures that are listed below. 

Recruitment and selection
Induction and probationary reviews
Supervision and appraisals
Training and development
Health and safety
Disciplinary policy and grievance procedures
Complaints policy and procedures
Code of professional conduct
Equal opportunities
Email, internet and telephone policy
Whistle blowing policy
Data protection. 

All of these policies are reviewed regularly to ensure they are in line with current guidance and good practice. The safeguarding policy will be evaluated and reviewed annually and be subject to Board approval to ensure it remains in line with statutory guidance and relevant to the work of the organisation. 

Staffing


Recruitment and selection
Through the implementation of our recruitment and selection policy, we endeavour to prevent unsuitable people from taking posts by completing a number of checks. These include taking up references prior to employment, establishing the identity of applicants and conducting enhanced DBS disclosures (where appropriate). We use specific criteria and processes during the recruitment and selection process that assist us in determining an individual’s suitability for the role.

Induction and probationary period
As part of the induction process, and by the end of the probationary period, all new workers will receive basic training on the organisation’s safeguarding policy and child protection procedures so they have the necessary knowledge and skills to safeguard and promote the welfare of children.

Within the first week of their induction, all staff will receive a copy of this policy and procedures. It is the line manager’s responsibility to ensure that the new staff member understands it and is able to follow it. For staff not based at Head Office, it is the responsibility of the individual and their line manager, within the first week of employment, to ensure they also have the relevant knowledge of the Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) (England and Wales) / Local Safeguarding Board (LSB) (Scotland) procedures within the area(s) they work in, as appropriate to their job role.

Training
Basic training on NDNA’s safeguarding policy and child protection procedures will be delivered to all staff at least once a year and all staff are expected to undertake refresher training every three years to remain up to date with current legislation. 

Early years specialist staff responsible for supporting staff and members with safeguarding concerns will also have access to an advanced version of the child protection training to enhance their understanding of how to protect children and identify signs and symptoms of abuse. 

Consultants and Volunteers (including self-employed assessors and trainers) shall be known as Associates for the purpose of this policy
It is the responsibility of NDNA to ensure that associates are familiar with the NDNA Safeguarding Children Policy Statement and prior to working with us sign up to this policy and agree to work within this framework. If there are any child protection concerns highlighted, these concerns must be raised following the steps outlined in this policy. 
All associates will be required to provide evidence that they have undertaken basic child protection training Any associates that are working in nurseries or working with early years specialist materials will be required to have undertaken the advanced version of the child protection training. 

Placement providers 
It is the responsibility of NDNA to ensure that placement providers are familiar with and sign up to the NDNA Safeguarding Children Policy Statement and agree to work within this framework. If there are any child protection concerns with the conduct of learners, these concerns must be raised following the steps outlined in this policy. 

Learners on placements or in employment 
It is the responsibility of NDNA to ensure that learners on placement or in employment are familiar with and sign up to the NDNA Safeguarding Children Policy Statement and agree to work within this framework. The learners will receive basic child protection training prior to their entrance into the placement / employment setting which will cover this policy. If there are any child protection concerns relating to the placement, these concerns must be raised following the steps outlined in this policy. 

Designated person
The Senior Designated Person (SDP) based at Head Office has overall responsibility for the safeguarding children policy and child protection procedures. It is their role to ensure that the policy and procedures are implemented to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. They are responsible for coordinating safeguarding and child protection training for staff across the organisation.

The SDP is Jo Baranek

The deputy SDP is Fiona Bland 

The role of the Senior Designated Person (SDP) is to:
Ensure that the safeguarding children policy and procedure in the organisation is working well by making sure that everyone understands the correct procedure to follow
Receive information from staff, volunteers, members, children and parents who have child protection concerns and record it
Keep up-to-date on good practice and national requirements for child protection 
Provide information on child protection within NDNA
Advise NDNA of any child protection training needs, and implement where necessary 
Assess the information promptly and carefully and refer as appropriate 
Consult with statutory child protection agencies
Be aware of the role of the local safeguarding children boards and the existence of local child protection procedures 
Make a formal referral to statutory child protection agencies or the police
Provide signposting to other organisations
Provide further support for members and NDNA staff following child protection cases
Ensure SMT and the Chief Executive are kept informed of any involvement in child protection cases. 

It is not the SDP’s role to decide whether or not a child has been abused or to investigate an allegation/disclosure. This must be done by the appropriate authorities, usually the police and social services.

Child Protection Procedures

(For all staff including office staff, field staff, consultants, freelance workers / associates and volunteers)

Introduction 
This procedure should be followed if for any reason you believe that a child is subject to welfare issues, including physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect (and bullying in Scotland).

Definitions
For the purposes of this procedure, safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children shall mean:
Protecting children from maltreatment
Preventing the impairment of children’s health or development 
Ensuring that children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care
Taking action to enable all children to have the best outcomes
(definition taken from the HM Government document ‘Working together to safeguard children’ 2013)

Child protection refers to the activity that is undertaken to protect specific children who are suffering, or are at risk of suffering, significant harm and is an integral part of safeguarding children and promoting their overall welfare.

Definition of significant harm
The Children Act 1989 introduced the concept of significant harm as ‘the threshold that justifies compulsory intervention in family life in the best interests of children’. It gives local authorities (LAs) a duty to make enquires to decide whether they should take action to safeguard or promote the welfare of a child who is suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm. 

Whilst there are no absolute criteria to rely on when judging what constitutes significant harm, consideration should be given to:
The severity of the ill-treatment including the degree of harm
The extent and frequency of abuse and/or neglect 
The impact this is likely to have or is having to the child / children involved.

This may be a single traumatic event, e.g. a violent assault, suffocation or poisoning or it can be a combination of events, both acute and long-standing, that impairs the physical, intellectual, emotional, social or behavioural development of the child.

Definition of abuse and neglect, and possible signs and indicators
Abuse and neglect are forms of maltreatment of a child. Somebody may abuse or neglect a child by harming them, or by failing to prevent harm. Children may be abused within a family, institution, or community setting by those known to them, or a stranger(s), (an adult or adults or another child or children). 

The signs and indicators listed below may not necessarily indicate that a child has been abused, but will help indicate that something may be wrong, especially if a child shows a number of these symptoms or any of them to a marked degree.

Physical abuse may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning, scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces illness in a child, or where an adult knowingly does not prevent an injury to a child.

Signs and indicators may include:
Unexplained recurrent injuries or burns other than those normally seen in a young child 
Improbable excuses or refusal to explain injuries
Wearing clothes to cover injuries, even in hot weather
Aggression towards others
Fear of physical contact - shrinking back if touched including fear of suspected abuser (not always the case) 
Admitting that they are being physically hurt. 

Emotional abuse is the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects in the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to children that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may include little or no contact or love given to the child from the abuser; this could also include a child being left with no stimulation or adult support for a sustained amount of time. 

It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another. It may involve serious bullying, causing children to frequently feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children. 

Signs and indicators may include:
Physical, mental and emotional development lags
Sudden speech disorders
Overreaction to mistakes
Extreme fear of any new situation
Neurotic behaviour (rocking, hair twisting, self-mutilation)
Extremes of passivity or aggression.

Sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, including prostitution, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact, including penetrative (e.g. rape, buggery or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts. They may include noncontact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of sexual online images, watching sexual activities, or encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways.
 
Signs and indicators may include:
Being overly affectionate or knowledgeable in a sexual way inappropriate to the child's age
Medical problems such as chronic itching, pain in the genitals, venereal diseases
Other extreme reactions, such as depression, self-mutilation, suicide attempts, running away, overdoses, anorexia
Personality changes such as becoming insecure or clingy 
Regressing to younger behaviour patterns such as thumb sucking or bringing out discarded cuddly toys
Sudden loss of appetite or compulsive eating
Being isolated or withdrawn
Inability to concentrate
Lack of trust or fear of someone they know well, such as not wanting to be alone with a carer
Becoming worried about clothing being removed
Suddenly drawing sexually explicit pictures or acting out actions inappropriate for their age 
Using sexually explicit language.  

Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and / or psychological needs, likely to result in serious impairment of the child’s health or development. Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse. 

Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to:
Provide adequate food, clothing (e.g. shoes may be too small on a persistent basis) or shelter (including exclusion from the home or abandonment)
Protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger
Ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers)
Ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.

It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

Signs and indicators may include:
Constant hunger
Poor personal hygiene / nappies remaining unchanged for a significant period of time 
Constant tiredness
Poor state of clothing or clothing such as shoes being too small / big and hurting the child when wearing them
Untreated medical problems
Compulsive scavenging
Destructive tendencies.

Fabricated illness is also a type of physical abuse. This is where a child is presented with an illness that is fabricated by the adult carer. The carer may seek out unnecessary medical treatment or investigation. The signs may include a carer exaggerating a real illness or symptoms, complete fabrication of symptoms or inducing physical illness e.g. through poisoning, starvation, inappropriate diet. This may also be presented through false allegations of abuse or encouraging the child to appear disabled or ill to obtain unnecessary treatment or specialist support.

For further details on concepts and definitions please see sources of information at the end of this page.

Internal procedures


Concerns that are called through or noted by NDNA staff will all be followed through, regardless of the nature of the concern and to whom the allegation relate. The following procedures should be adhered to all cases and cover all possible scenarios relating to disclosures of concern. 

NDNA will always act on behalf of the child and will do everything possible to ensure the safety and welfare of any child, so will take all allegations of potential abuse seriously. 

Responding to signs of abuse whilst out in a nursery


If whilst you are in a nursery you spot potential signs of abuse, it is important to notify the manager or owner of the setting immediately. You should follow the procedure laid out below wherever possible to record all facts and signs you have observed. As soon as possible you should also contact the SDP at head office to discuss the next course of action. 

The SDP will then liaise with the nursery and the member of staff involved to ensure appropriate steps are taken to ensure the safety and wellbeing of the child (or children) involved. If the manager is not receptive in this or any of the below situations, NDNA will follow through with all concerns to the Children’s Social Care/Child Protection team and Ofsted/CSSIW/Care Inspectorate to ensure these concerns are followed through.. If this concern relates to a member of nursery staff, the LADO (England and Wales) / Care Inspectorate and the Child Protection Team (Scotland) for that area will be called and informed. NDNA will also talk to the nursery about this referral and why this is necessary. NDNA will provide support to the nursery but the child is the priority in all cases and should remain foremost in all decisions made

Recording suspicions of abuse and disclosures when seen/heard in person 


If you note a concern or one is disclosed to you, NDNA staff should make an objective record of any observation or disclosure (with support from the nursery manager) and include (wherever possible):
Child's name and address 
Age of the child and date of birth 
Setting name and address
Date and time of the observation or the disclosure
Exact words spoken by the child / parent / staff member and details of the concern using factual information
Exact observation of a child’s / adult’s actions 
Exact injury or wound seen, including position and size 
Name of the person to whom the concern was reported, with date and time; and the names of any other person present at the time (including your details if a member of staff then relays the information to you).

This should then be discussed with the nursery manager and the SDP. After further discussion the matter may need to be raised with the Children’s Social Care/Child Protection team and Ofsted/CSSIW/Care Inspectorate. 

NDNA expects all members of staff, including volunteers and consultants to co-operate with the Children’s Social Care/Child Protection team and Ofsted / CSSIW / Care Inspectorate in any way necessary to ensure the safety of the children. In all cases you should support the nursery to disclose this information to the Children’s Social Care/Child Protection team and Ofsted/CSSIW/ Care Inspectorate.  However, if you feel they are not going to follow this through then it is your responsibility to follow this up with the appropriate body. NDNA’s priority lies with the welfare of the child. The nursery will be informed of this. 

Responding to a child’s disclosure of abuse (what to do and say)


Stay calm and listen carefully.  Try not to look shocked 
Find an appropriate opportunity to say that the information will need to be shared and do not promise to keep secrets
Allow the child to continue at their own pace
Only ask questions for clarification and avoid asking any questions that may suggest a particular answer
Reassure the child that they have done the right thing in telling you and tell them what you will do next and with whom the information will be shared. Reassure them that this is not their fault
Record this in writing using the child’s own words as soon as possible after the disclosure
Ensure that this includes the date and time, any names mentioned and to whom the information was given
Sign and date this before securely storing this record and referring this to the nursery manager and the SDP.

Responding to concerns raised by nurseries


When a nursery contacts NDNA about potential child protection concerns it is important to provide the appropriate support as soon as possible. 

In this instance it is important to record detail as required on the form on the K drive (link at end of this document) (i.e. name of person reporting, brief incident details – Is this child protection? Who is available to talk about this on return of a phone call? Telephone number and setting name (also CRM record number if possible) and refer the call to the SDP as soon as possible via a phone call. An email is not acceptable in these circumstances. If the SDP is not available it is vital that this concern is dealt with promptly so you should contact the deputy SDP in the same manner. In the unlikely absence of both please refer this call to Halie Ann Headley or Claire Schofield who will source alternative support, from another member of NDNA staff with the advanced training and knowledge of child protection. The phone call should be backed up with a record of the concern using the form on the link at the end of this policy

The SDP, or appropriate cover, will offer advice based on the seriousness of the concern; normally this will be referred to the nursery’s Children’s Social Care/Child Protection team who will be able to offer support and guidance and contact the appropriate person(s). The nursery should be reminded to call Ofsted/CSSIW/ Care Inspectorate to inform them of any details. If the matter relates to staff allegations please refer to the next section. 

Responding to allegations of abuse against member of nursery staff / volunteer (called in by a nursery)
A concern may be raised, or allegation made against a member of staff or volunteer who is working with children. Action will be taken where this allegation is made that the individual has: behaved in a way that has, or may have, harmed a child; possibly committed a criminal offence against or in relation to a child; behaved towards a child or children in a way that indicates he/she may be unsuitable to work with children. 

In this instance it is important to record detail as required on the K drive (link at end of this document) and refer the call to the SDP as soon as possible via a phone call. An email is not acceptable in these circumstances. If the SDP is not available it is vital that this concern is dealt with promptly so you should contact the deputy SDP in the same manner. In the unlikely absence of both please refer this call to Halie Ann Headley or Claire Schofield who will source alternative support. The phone call should be backed up with a record of the concern using the form on the link at the end of this policy

England


The SDP, or appropriate cover, will advise members to contact their Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO). They will be able to coordinate the investigation and ensure all parties are heard fairly and the child stays safe throughout.  
Ofsted should also be notified at the earliest opportunity. If the nursery is unwilling to do this NDNA will always follow through with this and notify the nursery of this decision. 

Wales


The SDP, or appropriate cover, will advise members to contact CSSIW. They will be able to coordinate the investigation and ensure all parties are heard fairly and the child stays safe throughout.  If the nursery is unwilling to do this NDNA will always follow through with this and notify the nursery of this decision.


Scotland


The SDP, or appropriate cover, will advise members to contact their local child protection team. They will be able to coordinate the investigation and ensure all parties are heard fairly and the child stays safe throughout.  If the nursery is unwilling to do this NDNA will always follow through with this and notify the nursery of this decision.

Disclosure by a nursery staff member


If a member of nursery staff calls NDNA with concerns relating to safeguarding it is important to record detail as required on the K drive (link at end of this document) and refer the call to the SDP as soon as possible via a phone call. An email is not acceptable in these circumstances. If the SDP is not available it is vital that this concern is dealt with promptly so you should contact the deputy SDP in the same manner. In the unlikely absence of both please refer this call to Halie Ann Headley or Claire Schofield who will source alternative support, from another member of NDNA staff with the advanced training and knowledge of child protection. The phone call should be backed up with a record of the concern using the form on the link at the end of this policy

The SDP, or appropriate cover, will offer advice based on the seriousness of the concern and who this relates to; normally this will be referred to the nursery manager or the nursery’s Children’s Social Care/Child Protection team as they will be able to offer support and guidance and contact the appropriate persons. 

If the matter relates to staff allegations please refer to the previous section (this also applies to allegations against the manager). If the nursery has a whistle blowing policy the SDP, or cover, should refer the member of staff to this document as this will support the member of staff through this process. If the staff member is unwilling to follow through with this concern, NDNA will do this to ensure the safety of the child, the individual will be notified of this. 

Disclosure by parents / public 


If a parent contacts NDNA about concerns relating to the care of their child at a nursery it is important that this is dealt with in an appropriate and timely manner to ensure the safety of the children within the nursery. 

In this instance it is important to record detail as required on the K drive (link at end of this document) and refer the call to the SDP as soon as possible via a phone call. An email is not acceptable in these circumstances. If the SDP is not available it is vital that this concern is dealt with promptly so you should contact the deputy SDP in the same manner. In the unlikely absence of both please refer this call to Halie Ann Headley or Claire Schofield who will source external support. The phone call should be backed up with a record of the concern using the form on the link at the end of this policy

The SDP should ask the parent if this matter has been brought to the manager’s attention and whether any action has been taken. The parent should be encouraged to refer this concern to Ofsted / CSSIW / Care Inspectorate on the numbers below and the Children’s Social Care/Child Protection team details of which can be found on most local authority websites. 

NDNA cannot investigate nurseries in the way that the regulators can and therefore if parents have concerns they should be raised with the appropriate persons so the regulators can visit the nursery and investigate. If the parents are reluctant to do so it is the responsibility of NDNA to do this to ensure the safety and welfare of the children in this setting, regardless of whether they are a member of NDNA or not. 

The SDP or appropriate cover should contact the numbers below and relay all information to the appropriate person. It is important when talking to the parent to ask if you can reveal details of their name, contact details and child’s details so that the regulator has all the information prior to the investigation. The more information we can give the inspectorate the better, as this will aide the investigation. 

If the complaint is received via letter or email it is important that the SDP or appropriate cover contact the complainant as soon as possible via phone to establish the situation and to be able to follow the above steps. If contact cannot be made via phone primarily, or by return of mail, it is still vital that the SDP or appropriate cover contacts the regulator with the information we have received. 

NDNA will take advice from the relevant body, either the regulator or the Children’s Social Care/Child Protection team about whether it can contact the nursery about any complaint made against them. This will not always be possible as this may hinder future investigations. 

Contact numbers for regulators: 


Ofsted 0300 1234 666

Care Inspectorate 0845 600 9527

CSSIW regional centres see below: 

North Region (Llandudno Junction) - 0300 0625609
Conwy, Anglesey, Gwynedd, Denbighshire, Flintshire, Wrexham

South East - 01495 761200
Blaenau Gwent, Caerphilly, Newport, Torfaen, Monmouthshire

Vale & Valleys - 01443 848527
Vale of Glamorgan, Rhondda Cynon Taff, Merthyr Tydfil, Cardiff, Powys

South West - 01792 310420
Swansea, Neath Port Talbot, Bridgend, Carmarthenshire, Pembrokeshire, Ceredigion


Allegation against a member of NDNA staff, volunteer, consultant 


If an allegation is made against a member of NDNA staff, volunteer or consultant, this should be referred to the NDNA SDP and HR as soon as possible. If the allegation refers to the SDP then HR and/or a member of SMT need to be contacted immediately. The SDP(or deputy) and HR will work together to gather all the appropriate information from the complainant and we will follow the staff allegation procedure as laid out in the previous ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children’ Government document (2010) (appendix 5 – see additional information) and contact the appropriate body in the appropriate nation (see below).

The person facing the allegation will be informed of the allegation made against them. If they are a member of staff, they will be suspended in line with the NDNA grievance and disciplinary procedures, and it is likely that this will continue during the investigation. Volunteers or consultants will not be given any further work until the investigation has been completed.

NDNA will cooperate with all investigations conducted by the appropriate body. Within England and Wales, if the member of staff resigns during the investigation, their details will be passed onto the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) to ensure their records are kept up to date. 
Following on from full investigations, details will be passed onto DBS if these investigations prove that the allegations are upheld. 

Confidentiality


Confidentiality should not override the right of children to be protected from harm.
However, we will make every effort to ensure confidentiality is maintained for all concerned when an allegation has been made and is being investigated. The aim of this policy is to not only protect children, but also the staff and volunteers who have responsibility for them, or regular contact with them.

If you are in any doubt about whether you can disclose sensitive information to a third party please call the Information Commissioner’s Office on 0303 123 1113
They will advice you about the particulars relating to each individual case and provide you with the official line on what information you can share and what you can’t.  

Data storage

 
We will follow the NDNA Data Protection policy with regards to any information received from any individual, however if the information relates to child protection we will ensure this is stored in a secure manner and stored for 21 years and 3 months. All information will be stored together in one place and any investigating body will have access to all information stored in order to support the investigation. Only persons involved in the investigation should handle this information. Details relating to safeguarding will not be stored on NDNA’s CRM system, but a reference will be made on the CRM to the records/correspondence which will be stored in an area of the K drive and in the case of hard copies in a lockable filing cabinet (Only the SDP and Claire Schofield will have the keys for this). The CRM reference will include who within NDNA to contact for details. Only designated persons, normally NDNA’s SMT and the SDP, will have access to these files. If the nursery is involved in a child protection case, there will be a note placed on CRM informing staff to contact the SDP or SMT member before contacting this nursery. 

Support for NDNA staff throughout this process
The SDP will support all staff throughout any of the processes listed above and will organise appropriate counselling should this be required. 
If any member of staff has any concerns about the content of this policy and its procedures they should speak to the SDP as soon as possible. If any member of staff wishes to talk confidentially about any safeguarding concern or any other issue relating to child protection or personal circumstance it is important to do this as soon as this arises in order to receive the appropriate support mechanisms from NDNA.  

Whistle-blowing


NDNA is developing a whistle-blowing policy that sets out what a member of staff, parent or child can do if they are concerned about a potential danger or illegality that they have witnessed. Whilst this policy is in development, please refer to HR for further information.

Legislation and guidance


NDNA adheres to all current legislation and staff will work in the best interests of the child to ensure their welfare and safety. Listed below are current legislative acts and guidance relating to safeguarding.
The Childcare Act 2006
Care Standards Act 2002 (Scotland)
The Children Act 2004
Children (Scotland) Act 1995
The Children Act 1989 (England and Wales)
Safeguarding Vulnerable Groups Act 2006
The Protection of Vulnerable Groups (Scotland) Act 2007
Criminal Justice and Court Services Act 2000
The Police Act 1997
The Data Protection Acts 1984 and 1998
The Human Rights Act 1998
The Sexual Offences Act 2003
Freedom of Information Act 2012    
Working together to safeguard children, HM Government, 2013
Working together under the children act, Welsh Assembly Government, 2006
Caring for Young Children and the Vulnerable
NSPCC Child Protection Helpline 0808 800 5000

The sources of information used in producing this policy and procedures are:


Statutory guidance in making arrangements to safeguard and promote the welfare of children under section 11 of the Children Act 2004
Working together to safeguard children - HM Government (2013) and previous version 2010 for the appendix relating to staff allegations 
NSPCC – www.nspcc.org.uk 
Kidscape - www.kidscape.org.uk