Save the Children report: shortage of 11,000 nursery teachers

NDNA has responded to the Save the Children findings published today citing a shortage of nursery teachers, describing it as a ‘wake-up call’ to government.Save the Children logo

The findings revealed a shortage of 11,000 early years teachers in private, voluntary and independent (PVI) settings across the country. In the most disadvantaged areas it highlighted a shortage of 2,000 graduate early years teachers.

The findings were uncovered by a Freedom of Information (FoI) request by the charity. 

Purnima Tanuku OBE, Chief Executive of NDNA, said: “These findings by Save the Children are not surprising but should be a real wake-up call for the Government. 

“Our own Workforce Survey (link to WF survey) this year showed that around half of the graduate level early years staff are leaving the sector due to pay concerns. We know from our research that practitioners who complete Early Years Teachers qualifications use these as a stepping stone to move into maintained sector schools where pay and conditions can be much more attractive. 

"If the Government is committed to closing the early development gap and boosting social mobility, it should be raising its level of ambition for early years education and ensuring the sector is adequately funded to enable them to retain Early Years Teachers within nursery settings.
 
“Our members show passion and commitment to providing excellent early education and care, they are struggling to recruit and retain practitioners, especially at the higher level of qualification. The fact that fewer people are enrolling in graduate training courses should tell the Government that this needs immediate attention to avert a future crisis.”

Read the full press release here.
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